New Arrivals · African-American Nonfiction

September 22, 2016
These titles were recently added to the collection of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County.

Blood brother : Jonathan Daniels and his sacrifice for civil rights

September 21, 2016
Wallace, Rich, author.
©2016
352 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
Crossing boundaries -- Behind the eight ball -- Military interference -- Quietly frantic -- Bloody Sunday -- Open hostility -- Higher stakes -- A life in danger -- Segregated worship -- Bloody Lowndes -- Stripped of color -- No back doors -- Jailed -- An eerie quiet -- Saying goodbye -- The Coleman trial -- The southern way -- Jonathan's revolution -- Epilogue: a life continues -- A note from the authors -- The ears have it: a note on our research -- Timeline -- Bibliography -- For further information -- Source notes -- Index.
"Jonathan Daniels, a white seminary student from New Hampshire, traveled to Selma, Alabama, in 1965 to help with voter registration of black residents. After the voting rights marches, he remained in Alabama, in the area known as Bloody Lowndes, an extremely dangerous area for white freedom fighters, to assist civil rights workers. Five months later, Jonathan Daniels was shot and killed while saving the life of Ruby Sales, a black teenager. Through Daniels' poignant letters, papers, photographs, and taped interviews, authors Rich Wallace and Sandra Neil Wallace explore what led Daniels to the moment of his death, the trial of his murderer, and how these events helped reshape both the legal and political climate of Lowndes County and the nation."--Publisher's website.

Black Power 50

September 16, 2016
New York : The New Press, [2016]
xiii, 144 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm
The black power movement -- The black power movement, the Black Panther party and racial coalitions -- Black power and "Education for liberation" -- America means prison: political prisoners in the age of black power -- The black arts movement -- International dimensions of the black power movement -- Black power: the looks.
"Black Power burst onto the world scene in 1966 with ideas, politics, and fashion that opened the eyes of millions of people across the globe. In the United States, the movement spread like wildfire: high school and college youth organized black student unions; educators created black studies programs; Black Power conventions gathered thousands of people from all walks of life; and books, journals, bookstores, and publishing companies spread Black Power messages and imagery throughout the country and abroad."--Provided by publisher.

The blacker the ink : constructions of black identity in comics and sequential art

August 31, 2016
New Brunswick, New Jersey : Rutgers University Press, [2015]
ix, 343 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Introduction: the sweeter the Christmas / Frances Gateward and John Jennings -- "No sweat!": EC Comics, cold war censorship, and the troublesome colors of Judgment day / Daniel F. Yezbick -- Sex in Yop City: Ivorian femininity and masculinity in Abouet and Oubrerie's Aya / Sally McWilliams -- A postcolony in pieces: black pieces, white masks, and queer potentials in Unknown soldier / Patrick Walter -- Fashion in the funny papers: cartoonist Jackie Ormes's American look / Nancy Goldstein -- Graphic remix: the lateral appropriation of Black nationalism in Aaron McGruder's The Boondocks / Robin R. Means Coleman and William Lafi Youmans -- American truths: Blackness and the American superhero / Consuela Francis -- Drawn into dialogue: comic book culture and the scene of controversy in Milestone Media's Icon / Andre Carrington -- Critical Afrofuturism: a case study in visual rhetoric, sequential art, and postapocalyptic Black identity / Reynaldo Anderson -- Bare chests, silver tiaras, and removable Afros: the visual design of Black comic book superheroes / Blair Davis -- "Daddy Cool": Donald Goines's visual novel / Kinohi Nishikawa -- The blues tragicomic: constructing the Black folk subject in Stagger Lee / Qiana Whitted -- Provocation through polyphony: Kyle Baker's Nat Turner / Craig Fischer -- Performance geography: making space in Jeremy Love's Bayou, volume 1 / Hershini Bhana Young -- A secret history of miscegenation: Jeremy Corrigan and the Columbian Exposition of 1893 / James J. Ziegler -- It's a hero?: Black comics and satirizing subjection / Rebecca Wanzo.
When many think of comic books the first thing that comes to mind are caped crusaders and spandex-wearing super-heroes. Perhaps, inevitably, these images are of white men (and more rarely, women). It was not until the 1970s that African American superheroes such as Luke Cage, Blade, and others emerged. But as this exciting new collection reveals, these superhero comics are only one small component in a wealth of representations of black characters within comic strips, comic books, and graphic novels over the past century. The Blacker the Ink is the first book to explore not only the diverse range of black characters in comics, but also the multitude of ways that black artists, writers, and publishers have made a mark on the industry. Organized thematically into "panels" in tribute to sequential art published in the funny pages of newspapers, the fifteen original essays take us on a journey that reaches from the African American newspaper comics of the 1930s to the Francophone graphic novels of the 2000s. Even as it demonstrates the wide spectrum of images of African Americans in comics and sequential art, the collection also identifies common character types and themes running through everything from the strip The Boondocks to the graphic novel Nat Turner. Though it does not shy away from examining the legacy of racial stereotypes in comics and racial biases in the industry, The Blacker the Ink also offers inspiring stories of trailblazing African American artists and writers. Whether you are a diehard comic book fan or a casual reader of the funny pages, these essays will give you a new appreciation for how black characters and creators have brought a vibrant splash of color to the world of comics.--Publisher's web site.

Carry on : a story of resilience, redemption, and an unlikely family

August 23, 2016
Fenn, Lisa, author.
©2016
305 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
"An Emmy-winning ESPN producer describes how she developed a surprising, profound and lasting bond with two disabled African-American, inner-city high school wrestlers after filming a segment about them for television,"--NoveList.

Portfolio. Il grand tour delle insegnanti.

August 23, 2016
Roma [Italy] : Internazionale s.r.l., [2016]
pages 64-69 : illustrations, some color ; 28 cm.
Title from the portfolio feature of the issue.
"Tutte le foto per gentile concessione di The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County"--Page 64.

Civil rights movement

August 18, 2016
Capek, Michael.
Minneapolis, MN : ABDO Publishing Company, [2014]
112 pages : illustrations (some color), map ; 24 cm.
Includes index.
The Montgomery Bus Boycott -- Reconstruction and oppression -- Segregation and education -- New tactics, same response -- Free at last? -- The key to the door of freedom -- Days of rage: burn, baby, burn! -- Civil rights beyond the 1960s -- Timeline -- Essential facts -- Glossary -- Additional resources -- Source notes -- Index -- About the author and consultant.
Looks at the history, events, and impact of the civil rights movement in the United States in the 1950s and 1960s.

Troubled refuge : struggling for freedom in the Civil War

August 17, 2016
Manning, Chandra, author.
New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2016.
396 pages, 8 unnumbered pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
"This is a Borzoi book" -- copyright page
Part I. Out of Egypt -- Grit and limits: experiencing emancipation in eastern contraband camps -- Constant turbulence: experiencing emancipation in western contraband camps -- Part II. By the sword -- Precarious routes to freedom: wartime emancipation in contraband camps -- Uneasy alliances: wartime citizenship in contraband camps -- Part III. Time in the desert -- Imperfect ploughshares: from military to civil authority, April-December 1865 -- Conclusion.
Even before shots were fired at Fort Sumter, slaves recognized that their bondage was at the root of the war, and they began running to the Union army. By the war's end, nearly half a million had taken refuge behind Union lines in improvised "contraband camps". These were crowded and dangerous places, with conditions approaching those of a humanitarian crisis, yet families and individuals took unimaginable risks to reach them, and they became the first places where many Northerners would come to know former slaves en masse. Drawing on records of the Union and Confederate armies, the letters and diaries of soldiers, transcribed testimonies of former slaves, and more, Manning sweeps us along, from the contraband camps, sharing insight and stories of individuals and armies on the move, to debates in the halls of Congress. --adapted from publisher website.

The rest I will kill : William Tillman and the unforgettable story of how a free black man refused to become a slave

August 16, 2016
McGinty, Brian, author.
New York : Liveright Publishing Corporation, a division of W. W. Norton & Company, [2016]
236 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, map ; 22 cm
A free black man -- To sea -- The capture -- Now is our time -- The return -- A hero's welcome -- A matter of compensation -- Passing judgment -- The fury continues -- Epilogue: a black man's fate.

Queen Anne's County, Maryland, marriage references and family relationships

August 15, 2016
Esgar, Lyndeth, author.
©2014
volumes ; 28 cm
Negro marriages and family relationships: pages 237-239 of first work; pages 289-318 of second work.
"D1699"--Page [4] of cover.
[Vol. 1] 1706-1800 -- [v. 2] 1800-1850
These volumes contain a comprehensive collection of marriages, both actual and implied, gleaned from a variety of sources including church records, court records, probate records, land records, Bible records, published family histories and more.

Born bright : a young girl's journey from nothing to something in America

August 11, 2016
Mason, C. Nicole, 1976- author.
New York : St. Martin's Press, 2016.
242 pages : illustration ; 25 cm
What do you want to be? -- Day of reckoning -- A crack in the foundation -- Origins -- The end of things -- Starved -- Putting out the fire -- Free today -- A home of our own -- Only one rule -- 54 out of 54 -- Death is here -- Wedding day -- Home street -- Seeing with only these eyes -- Away -- Not poor, poor -- Sonnie's got a baby - Cell block high -- A place called home -- A light -- Food for all -- New mission -- Gone -- In the desert -- Brighter -- Little brother -- Accepted -- Graduation -- I'll fly away -- What should be done?
"'C. Nicole Mason's powerful memoir, is a story of reconciliation, constrained choices and life on the other side of the tracks. Born in the 1970s in Los Angeles, California, Mason was raised by a beautiful, but volatile16-year-old single mother. Early on, she learned to navigate between an unpredictable home life and school where she excelled. By high school, Mason was seamlessly straddling two worlds. The first, a cocoon of familiarity where street smarts, toughness and the ability to survive won the day. The other, foreign and unfamiliar with its own set of rules, not designed for her success. In her Advanced Placement classes and outside of her neighborhood, she felt unwelcomed and judged because of the way she talked, dressed and wore her hair. After moving to Las Vegas to live with her paternal grandmother, she worked nights at a food court in one of the Mega Casinos while finishing school. Having figured out the college application process by eavesdropping on the few white kids in her predominantly Black and Latino school along with the help of a long ago high school counselor, Mason eventually boarded a plane for Howard University, alone and with $200 in her pocket. While showing us her own path out of poverty, Mason examines the conditions that make it nearly impossible to escape and exposes the presumption harbored by many--that the poor don't help themselves enough"--Provided by publisher.

My sisters keeper : a collection of poems

August 10, 2016
Davidson, Patricia R., author.
[North Charleston, SC] : [CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform], [2013]
56 unnumbered pages ; 25 cm
Title from cover.
Some poems written by Michael Ann Davidson.

March

August 3, 2016
Lewis, John, 1940 February 21-
Marietta, GA : Top Shelf Productions, 2013-2016
3 volumes : chiefly ill. ; 24 cm.
John Lewis's autobiographical account of his lifelong battle for civil rights for all Americans.

Hip hop family tree

August 3, 2016
Piskor, Ed.
Seattle, Wash. : Fantagraphics Books, 2014-
v. : chiefly col. ill. ; 33 cm.
v. 1. 1970s-1981 -- v. 2. 1981-1983 -- v. 3. 1983-1984 -- v. 4. 1984-1985

Historical dictionary of the civil rights movement

August 2, 2016
Richardson, Christopher M., 1981-
Lanham, Maryland : Rowman & Littlefield, [2014]
xxxi, 629 pages ; 24 cm.
"The second edition of Historical Dictionary of the Civil Rights Movement is a guide to the history of the African-American struggle for equal rights in the United States. The history of this period is covered in a detailed chronology, an introductory essay, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 500 cross-referenced entries on important personalities, significant legal cases, local struggles, forgotten heroes, and prominent women in the Movement. This book is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about the Civil Rights Movement"--Provided by publisher.

Nobody : casualties of America's war on the vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and beyond

August 1, 2016
Hill, Marc Lamont, author.
New York : Atria Books, 2016.
xx, 250 pages ; 24 cm
Nobody -- Broken -- Bargained -- Armed -- Caged -- Emergency -- Somebody.
"A leading intellect in America presents a powerful, thought-provoking analysis of deeper meaning behind the string of deaths of unarmed citizens like Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Freddie Gray--providing important insights on the intersection of race and class in America today"-- Provided by publisher.

The fire this time : a new generation speaks about race

July 28, 2016
New York : Scribner, 2016.
viii, 226 pages ; 22 cm
Legacy -- Homegoing, AD / by Kima Jones -- The Weight / by Rachel Ghansah / Lonely in America / by Wendy S. Walters -- Where Do We Go from Here? / by Isabel Wilkerson -- "The Dear Pledges of Our Love": A Defense of Phillis Wheatley's Husband / Honoree Jeffers -- White Rage / by Carol Anderson -- Cracking the Code / by Jesmyn Ward -- Reckoning -- Queries of Unrest / by Clint Smith -- Blacker Than Thou / by Kevin Young -- Da Art of Storytellin' (a prequel) / by Kiese Laymon -- Black and Blue / by Garnette Cadogan -- The Condition of Black Life is One of Mourning / by Claudia Rankine -- Know Your Rights! / by Emily Raboteau -- Composite Pops / by Mitchell Jackson -- Jubilee -- Theories of Time and Space / by Natasha Trethewey -- Love in the Time of Contradiction / by Daniel Jose Older -- Message to My Daughters / by Edwidge Danticat.
"National Book Award-winner Jesmyn Ward takes James Baldwin's 1963 examination of race in America, The Fire Next Time, as a jumping off point for this groundbreaking collection of essays and poems about race from the most important voices of her generation and our time. In light of recent tragedies and widespread protests across the nation, The Progressive magazine republished one of its most famous pieces: James Baldwin's 1962 "Letter to My Nephew," which was later published in his landmark book, The Fire Next Time. Addressing his fifteen-year-old namesake on the one hundredth anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, Baldwin wrote: "You know and I know, that the country is celebrating one hundred years of freedom one hundred years too soon." Award-winning author Jesmyn Ward knows that Baldwin's words ring as true as ever today. In response, she has gathered short essays, memoir, and a few essential poems to engage the question of race in the United States. And she has turned to some of her generation's most original thinkers and writers to give voice to their concerns. The Fire This Time is divided into three parts that shine a light on the darkest corners of our history, wrestle with our current predicament, and envision a better future. Of the eighteen pieces, ten were written specifically for this volume. In the fifty-odd years since Baldwin's essay was published, entire generations have dared everything and made significant progress. But the idea that we are living in the post-Civil Rights era, that we are a "post-racial" society is an inaccurate and harmful reflection of a truth the country must confront. Baldwin's "fire next time" is now upon us, and it needs to be talked about. Contributors include Carol Anderson, Jericho Brown, Garnette Cadogan, Edwidge Danticat, Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, Mitchell S. Jackson, Honoree Jeffers, Kima Jones, Kiese Laymon, Daniel Jose Older, Emily Raboteau, Claudia Rankine, Clint Smith, Natasha Trethewey, Wendy S. Walters, Isabel Wilkerson, and Kevin Young"-- Provided by publisher.

Memoirs of an eternal optimist

July 8, 2016
Niang, Thione, author.
North Charleston, SC : CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform]
224 pages ; 23 cm
"A personal story of perseverance, triumph over obstacles and the power of a dream."
"[This] is a riveting story that tells the personal journey of international business leader and political strategist, Thione Niang. The story chronicles Niang's life as a young boy raised in a modest polygamist family of 28 in Kaolack, Senegal, to becoming the national Co-Chair of GEN44 Barack Obama's presidential campaign for voters under 40, called Gen44. Thione Niang, undeterred, persevered despite numerous obstacles, learning valuable life lessons from each achievement. Niang presents his journey to inspire those who hope to construct a better world for today and generations to come. He created Give1Project, a global nonprofit organization, for youth empowerment and it is currently in 30 countries.. This captivating book highlights the numerous adversities that Thione encountered as a young man, and is a testament to dreaming big. In the moments when despair awaits, try to remember that you are acting not only for you, but also for your parents, friends and relatives, your city, your country. You do it for the youth of the world. In braving difficulties, by moving one step forward, you allow the youth of the world to improve, you make the world better."--Page [4] of cover.

Progressive racism : the collected conservative writings of David Horowitz

July 7, 2016
Horowitz, David, 1939- author.
New York ; London : Encounter Books, [2016]
xiii, 343 pages ; 24 cm
The Reds and the Blacks -- Decline and Fall of the Civil Rights Movement -- Racial Correctness --Reparations for Slavery -- Progressive Racism.

There goes my social life : from Clueless to conservative

July 7, 2016
Dash, Stacey, author.
©2016
xviii, 254 pages ; 24 cm
The Tweet That Changed My Life -- The Pretentious Unpretentious -- Why Black People Should Vote Republican Every Time -- The Voice No One Heard -- The Decision Maker -- Education, the Great Integrator -- The Power of Family -- Searching for a Fairy Tale -- Life and Death -- Not Really Clueless -- God's Way -- You Shall Tweet the Truth, and the Truth Shall Set You Free -- Love.
"In 2012, actress Stacey Dash posted a tweet that changed her life. Up until that moment, Dash had lived a typical Hollywood life: Best known for playing Dionne in the 1995 teen classic Clueless, Dash had close friends in the upper echelons of the movie and music industries-and she had an Obama bumper sticker on the back of her BMW. But in 2012, sick of being disappointed by the Obama White House and growing more certain of her conservative beliefs, Dash endorsed Mitt Romney for president on Twitter. The backlash was swift and brutal. In There Goes My Social Life, Stacey Dash explains how she became a conservative, sharing incredible stories of her rough upbringing in South Bronx and her tumultuous Hollywood career to movingly illustrate her strong opinions about the value of a good education, the importance of family, the inanity of political correctness, and the power of personal responsibility"-- Provided by publisher.

The social life of DNA : race, reparations, and reconciliation after the genome

June 30, 2016
Nelson, Alondra, author.
Boston : Beacon Press, [2016]
xiii, 200 pages ; 24 cm
Introduction -- Reconciliation projects -- Ground work -- Game changer -- The pursuit of African ancestry -- Roots revelations -- Acts of reparation -- The Rosa Parks of the reparation litigation movement -- DNA diasporas -- Racial politics.

Of poetry & protest : from Emmett Till to Trayvon Martin

June 28, 2016
New York : W. W. Norton & Company, 2016.
219 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm
Elizabeth Alexander -- Amiri Baraka -- Wanda Coleman -- Kwame Dawes -- Toi Derricotte -- Rita Dove -- Camille T. Dungy -- Cornelius Eady -- Kelly Norman Ellis -- Thomas Sayers Ellis -- Nikky Finney -- Nikki Giovanni -- C. S. Giscombe -- Duriel E. Harris -- Reginald Harris -- Terrance Hayes -- Angela Jackson -- Major Jackson -- Tyehimba Jess -- Patricia Spears Jone -- Douglas Kearney -- Yusef Komunyakaa -- Quraysh Ali Lansana -- Haki Madhubuti -- Devorah Major -- E. Ethelbert Miller -- Harryette Mullen -- Marilyn Nelson -- Sterling Plumpp -- Eugene B. Redmond -- Ishmael Reed -- Ed Roberson -- Sonia Sanchez -- Evie Shockley -- Tim Seibles -- Patricia Smith -- Tracy K. Smith -- Lamont B. Steptoe -- Natasha Trethewey -- Quincy Troupe -- Frank X Walker -- Afaa N. Weaver -- Ronaldo V. Wilson -- Al Young.

The strange career of William Ellis : the Texas slave who became a Mexican millionaire

June 27, 2016
Jacoby, Karl, 1965- author.
New York : W.W. Norton & Company, [2016]
xxviii, 304 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, map ; 25 cm
Prologue: Through history's cracks -- Part I. Victoria -- Gone to Texas -- Juneteenth -- Part II. San Antonio/Tlahualilo -- Military Plaza -- The land of God and liberty -- Part III. Manhattan/Mexico City -- A picturesque figure -- The city of happy homes -- Epilogue: Trickster makes this world -- Afterword.
"A prize-winning historian tells a new story of the black experience in America through the life of a mysterious entrepreneur. To his contemporaries in Gilded Age Manhattan, Guillermo Eliseo was a fantastically wealthy Mexican, the proud owner of a luxury apartment overlooking Central Park, a busy Wall Street office, and scores of mines and haciendas in Mexico. But for all his obvious riches and his elegant appearance, Eliseo was also the possessor of a devastating secret: he was not, in fact, from Mexico at all. Rather, he had begun life as a slave named William Ellis, born on a cotton plantation in southern Texas during the waning years of King Cotton. After emancipation, Ellis, capitalizing on the Spanish he learned during his childhood along the Mexican border and his ambivalent appearance, engaged in a virtuoso act of reinvention. He crafted an alter ego, the Mexican Guillermo Eliseo, who was able to access many of the privileges denied to African Americans at the time: traveling in first-class train berths, staying in upscale hotels, and eating in the finest restaurants. The Strange Career of William Ellis reads like a novel but offers fresh insights on the history of the Reconstruction era, the US-Mexico border, and the abiding riddle of race. At a moment when the United States is deepening its connections with Latin America and recognizing that race is more than simply black or white, Ellis's story could not be more timely or important"--Provided by publisher.

Jackson, 1964 : and other dispatches from fifty years of reporting on race in America

June 24, 2016
Trillin, Calvin, author.
New York : Random House, [2016]
xxi, 275 pages ; 22 cm
Introduction -- Jackson, 1964 (JACKSON, MS, 1964) -- The Zulus (NEW ORLEANS, LA, 1964) -- During the thirty-third week of National Guard patrols (WILMINGTON, DE, 1968) -- A hearing : "In the matter of disciplinary action involving certain students of Wisconsin State University Oshkosh" (OSHKOSH, WI, 1968) -- Doing the right thing isn't always easy (DENVER, CO, 1969) -- Categories (PROVO, UT, 1970) -- G.T. Miller's plan (LUVERNE, AL, 1970) -- Not super-outrageous (HOUSTON, TX, 1970) -- Victoria Delee : in her own words (DORCHESTER COUNTY, SC, 1971) -- Kawaida (NEWARK, NJ, 1972) -- Causes and circumstances (SEATTLE, WA, 1975) -- The unpleasantness at Whimsey's (BOSTON, MA, 1976) -- Remembrance of moderates past (1977) -- Black or white Louisiana (1986) -- The color of blood (LONG ISLAND, NY, 2008) -- State secrets (MISSISSIPPI, 1995).
An anthology of previously uncollected essays, originally published in "The New Yorker," reflects the work of the eminent journalist's early career and traces his witness to the fledgling years of desegregation in Georgia.

83 minutes : the doctor, the damage, and the shocking death of Michael Jackson

June 22, 2016
Richards, Matt, 1967- author.
©2015
426 pages ; 24 cm
Reprint. Originally published: London : Blink Publishing, 2015.
"For the first time, readers have access to [an] ... account of the crucial moments leading up to Jackson's demise. Drawing on court documents and testimonials, [the book] presents a multi-perspective tracking of every individual involved and the part they played as the tragedy unfolded, examining forensically the mystery of the 83 minutes that elapsed from the moment Dr. Murray suggested he found Jackson not breathing to the moment the singer's lifeless body was wheeled into hospital"--Dust jacket flap.

Invisible man, got the whole world watching : a young black man's education

June 17, 2016
Smith, Mychal Denzel, 1986- author.
New York : Nation Books, [2016]
224 pages ; 22 cm
"A prominent journalist and contributing writer to The Nation magazine describes his education and the experiences of black masculinity against a backdrop of the Obama administration, the death of Trayvon Martin, the career of LeBron James and other pivotal influences that have shaped race relations in today's America,"--NoveList.

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